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Buc's Adventures

Get to know our two beloved mascots during Sea Term 2020!  For seven weeks, Little Buc and Big Buc will educate you and keep you entertained.  They’ll take you behind the scenes aboard the TS Kennedy and introduce to spaces and places that even some cadets miss.  Somehow, these two pirates always know the latest shipboard information – and they’ll be sure to pass it along to you.  You’ll even see Big Buc and Little Buc taking selfies with the cadets and crew.  The adventure begins on Monday, January 6th!  Hang on!  With these two pirates leading the way, it’s sure to be a wild ride.

  Ahoy, Followers! If it’s Tuesday, then it must be time to talk about the Cape Cod Canal and the Panama Canal.  Last week, I told you about how centuries passed between when the idea for each canal was first presented and when construction of the canal first began.  Today, let’s looks at the two construction projects. The Cape Cod Canal Businessman August Belmont II dug the first ceremonial shovel of soil himself on June 22, 1909.  Then, the work began!  His plan was to connect and widen the Manomet River and Scusset River. Twenty-six dredgers were used to deepen the rivers.  Dynamite was used to move massive boulders that had been in place since the Ice Age.  Harsh New England…
  Ahoy, Ye Matey! It’s our third…Nautical Idiom Tuesday!  Before I share two new idioms with you, let’s review the four idioms that we learned so far.  1.  all hands:  everyone 2.  anchors aweigh: raise the anchor 3.  learn the ropes: learn all of the skills necessary to perform a task 4.  pipe down:  be quiet I hope that you have been using them in your speaking and writing.  If you see one of our nautical idioms in a book, be sure to let me know.  Send me an email to ftv@maritime.edu.  I’d love to know the title and author of the book and the line where the nautical idiom was found. I loved hearing cadets shouting, "Anchors aweigh!" during the anchor drills on Friday and…
  Little Buc:  Ahoy, Followers!  Ahoy, Giles!  When I heard the ship’s bell ring yesterday, it reminded me of our visit to Plimoth Plantation on September 1st.  What a thrill to hear Mayflower II’s new bell rung for the very first time! Giles Hopkins:  I am glad that you were able to join me!  What a wonderful day it was! Little Buc:  I am sure that our followers are as curious as I am about why Mayflower II needed a new bell.  Like me, they are probably wondering what  happened to the bell that was on the ship since 1957.  The TS Kennedy’s bell has been ringing since she was launched as the Velma Lykes back in 1964. (left/#1, #3) We’ve never considered getting a new bell.…
  Ahoy, Ye Matey! Happy Cloudy Monday!  I hope that you had a great weekend and managed to do some cloud spotting.  Did you see any Cirrus clouds or Cirrocumulus clouds?  I’m excited to introduce this week’s Cloud Of The Week… The Cloud Of The Week is the Cirrostratus! 1.  Like Cirrus and Cirrocumulus clouds, Cirrostratus clouds are high level clouds. 2.  Cirrostratus clouds form above 23,000 feet.  big 3.  Cs is the abbreviation for Cirrostratus clouds.  (The abbreviation for Cirrus clouds is C and the abbreviation for Cirrocumulus clouds is Cc.) 4.  Ice crystals makeup Cirrostratus clouds. When the sun or the moon shine through Cirrostratus clouds that causes the light to…
Ahoy, Follower! Greetings from beautiful Mayaguez Bay off the western coast of Puerto Rico!  As the ship cruised toward the island, I was out on deck gazing down at the sapphire blue ocean.  Instead of seeing marine life, I spotted a few empty water bottles, a one-time use shopping bag, and what appeared to be a black fishing net.   What’s even scarier than what I saw, is what I didn’t see – microplastics.  Microplastics are tiny pieces of plastic debris.  Do you have a metric ruler handy?  Microplastics are less than 5 millimeters in length.  That’s about the size of a sesame seed. Are you wondering where these tiny enemies of the sea come from?  When larger plastic items degrade…
  Ahoy, Followers! It’s time for…Little Buc’s Colorful TS Kennedy! I received great feedback from Follow The Voyage – Share The Experience participants about last week’s Little Buc’s Colorful Kennedy feature.  The students and teachers enjoyed seeing the green items that I photographed as I scurried around the ship.  They also said that they had fun trying to guess what the items were and how they might be used.  So…let’s keep this colorful journey going.  This week, I was on a hunt for YELLOW items.  It wasn’t an easy task, but I enjoy a challenge.  Let’s just say, I got quite a workout! Here’s what I discovered. Your colorful friend on the TS Kennedy, Little Buc…
  Ahoy, Matey! Do you have two friends with the same first name? How do you distinguish between the two of them when you are talking about them?  Perhaps you use their last name or mention something about where they live or what they like to do.  Sometimes vessels share the same name.  In times of emergency, that could present a big problem.  Also, sometimes vessels have complicated names that may be difficult to pronounce during radio communication.  As a ship travels the world, it is important that they can be easily contacted, even when there is a language barrier.  Don’t worry!  A simple solution to this problem has already been found.  Each vessel is assigned a “call sign”…
Wednesday, January 13, 2020 Ahoy, Mates! As you know, W is for Wednesday…and for Women!  This week, I am excited to introduce you to First Engineer Leanne Robertson, the first female Chief Engineer.  She is currently working aboard Carnival’s P&O Cruise Line’s Azura, a 951-foot luxury ship that is docked today in Phillipsburg, St. Maarten. First Engineer Robertson is responsible for the management of the ship’s team of close to ninety engineers and maintaining the main propulsion machinery and the rest of the equipment in the engine room.  Leanne attended South Tyneside College in Northeast England.  In January 2005, Leanne Robertson began her career in marine engineering.  She…
  Good Morning, Followers - Today is a somber anniversary in Massachusetts, but it is also a day that fills with Massachusetts Maritime Academy cadets with pride.  Exactly 101 years ago, a large storage tank filled with 2,300,000 gallons of molasses burst in the North End of Boston.  It created a powerful, sticky wave that roared through the neighborhood at a speed of thirty-five miles per hour.  Twenty-one people lost their lives.  Over 150 people were injured, some seriously.  Homes and businesses were destroyed, part of the elevated railroad collapsed, trucks were sent flying through the air, and the local fire station was reduced to a pile of rubble.  Perhaps you’ve read a…
  Ahoy, Ye Matey! It’s Tuesday, so that means it is…Nautical Idiom Tuesday!  Before I get to today’s two idioms, I want to again thank you to the talented fourth graders from Wakefield, Rhode Island who shared their illustration of the idioms “anchors aweigh” and “all hands” last week.  I hope you took the time to view their illustrations.  If you missed the post, just scroll back and look for, A Big Buc Bonus: Rhode Island Students Illustrate “All Hands” And “Anchors Aweigh”. Now, let’s get to my two new nautical idioms. Learn The Ropes As you know, ropes and lines are widely used on board the TS Kennedy, so you are probably guessing that this idiom means that cadets should…